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EU at the UN

The EU's commitment to effective multilateralism, with the UN at its core, is a central element of its external action. As a UN observer with enhanced status, the EU delegation coordinates with its 28 Member States to speak with one voice. The EU also works closely with the UN secretariat and its agencies, funds & programmes, partnering on a range of global issues and challenges.

Mr. President, 

I have the honour to speak on behalf of the European Union.

The Candidate Countries Turkey, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Iceland and Serbia, the countries of the Stabilisation and Association Process and potential candidates Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as Ukraine, Armenia and Georgia align themselves with this statement.

The European Union and its Member States, which act as a single Participant in the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS), would like in the first place to commend South Africa for its successful Chairmanship of the Kimberly Process in a year that marked the 10th anniversary of the Scheme, and to welcome the results achieved in so far as they illustrate the important efforts deployed to continue strengthening the Kimberley Process and confront the challenges of the future.

The EU welcomes the fruitful work this year and notably the approval by the recent KP Plenary meeting of modifications to the Annexes of the KP Core Document, and the agreement to continue examining and reviewing KPCS minimum requirements and recommendations with a view to strengthening implementation. The EU also welcomes the adoption of Administrative Decisions on Chairmanship and membership of KP working bodies, the Guidelines for the preparation, review and analysis of KP statistical data and the revised technical definitions. We firmly believe that the consistent use of these implementation tools will strengthen the KP’s ability to tackle illicit trade in conflict diamonds and calls on all Participants to step up efforts in this respect.

As Chair of the KP Working Group on Monitoring, the EU has actively contributed to strengthening the implementation and encourages Participants to continue committing themselves to enhanced scrutiny through KP peer review visits as well as to substantive annual reports. The EU would in particular like to express appreciation to South Africa, Liberia, the Russian Federation, Singapore and Vietnam for having hosted review visits in 2013 and to the countries which have invited review visits in 2014-15.

Furthermore, the EU notes with satisfaction that the KP intends to further improve its transparency and promote the publication of annual and review visit reports. 

We also believe that the joint EU-India KP Certification Scheme data-sharing platform as presented at the KP Plenary could be considered a good practice example for Participants to enhance information sharing as regards KP implementation. The KPCS’s credibility as an international process depends on effective implementation and enforcement by its Participants. In this regard, the number of fake certificates detected and the illegal shipments blocked in 2013 testify that the KP is effective in deterring conflict diamonds from entering the legitimate trade. The EU looks forward to further progress in that area in 2014.

In light of UN Security Council Resolution 2101 (2013), KP engagement with Côte d’Ivoire has illustrated the positive role that the scheme can play in situations where production and trade of diamonds might affect peace and security. As Chair of the Working Group on Monitoring and facilitator of the Friends of Côte d’Ivoire group, the EU was part of the recent KP Review Mission to Côte d’Ivoire and has been helping the country to fulfill KP minimum requirements as possibly could be achieved under the UN embargo. The EU welcomes the good cooperation with the authorities of Côte d’Ivoire in meeting the KPCS requirements and is determined to further support Côte d’Ivoire’s efforts to develop a transition strategy and roadmap towards the lifting of the UN embargo, and as such ensure that Ivorian diamonds will contribute to recovery and development. In this context, the EU through its Instrument for Stability will provide technical assistance for promoting the formalisation of the artisanal mining sector and reinforcing the country’s chain of custody.

As regards other countries in West Africa, the EU welcomes the KP’s continued engagement with Liberia under UN Security Council Resolution 2079 (2012), as regional cooperation remains key to ensuing stability in the region. In this context, the EU also very much welcomes the initiative from Participants in the Mano River region to enhance their cooperation on KPCS implementation and policy harmonization efforts.

The most recent testimonial of the KP’s ability to deal with situations of non-compliance has been the temporary suspension of the Central African Republic from the Certification Scheme in May 2013. As the Chair of the KP Working Group on Monitoring, the EU is monitoring the situation  and welcomes the efforts made by the Central African Republic’s KP authorities to develop a work plan for strengthening the country’s internal control system, however, we feel that the security conditions in the country do not currently provide guarantees for preserving the integrity of the chain of custody of diamonds.

In looking forward, the EU welcomes the decision taken at the KP Plenary meeting in Johannesburg to consider establishing an innovation committee with a view to encouraging further debate on KP reform issues and how the scheme can respond to wider ethical issues. We strongly support the need to further strengthen and adapt the KP to meet future challenges in the global diamond supply chain and provide assurance for consumers that diamonds are not teinted by violence. 

Before I conclude, please allow me to stress that one of the unique features of the KP is its tripartite structure. Both industry and civil society are key elements in the KP and have contributed much to its initial establishment and subsequent operation. In this respect, the EU calls on all Participants and Observers to recognise the full diversity of opinions within the KP and continue working together to further enhance the Scheme’s credibility.

Mr. President, 

In 2013, the international community has demonstrated its determination to act collectively and constructively through the Kimberley Process, as a valuable instrument to prevent diamonds from fuelling conflicts and, ultimately contribute to economic and social development, particularly in developing countries. In this context, the EU welcomes the framework for implementation of the Washington Declaration on integrating development and artisanal and small-scale diamond mining in the Kimberley Process.

The EU would like to express its gratitude to South Africa for its stewardship of the Process this year. We now warmly welcome the People’s Republic of China as the incoming KP Chair  during the start of the second decade of the process and congratulate Angola with its election as the incoming KP Vice-Chair. We look forward to working closely with both the new KP Chairmanship and the Vice-Chair to bring renewed impetus and strength to the KPCS.

Thank you, Mr. President.

Mr. President, 

I have the honour to speak on behalf of the European Union.

The Candidate Countries Turkey, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Iceland and Serbia, the countries of the Stabilisation and Association Process and potential candidates Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as Ukraine, Armenia and Georgia align themselves with this statement.

The European Union and its Member States, which act as a single Participant in the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS), would like in the first place to commendSouth Africa for its successful Chairmanship of the Kimberly Process in a year that marked the 10th anniversary of the Scheme, and to welcome the results achieved in so far as they illustrate the important efforts deployed to continue strengthening the Kimberley Process and confront the challenges of the future.

The EU welcomes the fruitful work this year and notably the approval by the recent KP Plenary meeting of modifications to the Annexes of the KP Core Document, and the agreement to continue examining and reviewing KPCS minimum requirements and recommendations with a view to strengthening implementation. The EU also welcomes the adoption of Administrative Decisions on Chairmanship and membership of KP working bodies, the Guidelines for the preparation, review and analysis of KP statistical data and the revised technical definitions. We firmly believe that the consistent use of these implementation tools will strengthen the KP’s ability to tackle illicit trade in conflict diamonds and calls on all Participants to step up efforts in this respect.

As Chair of the KP Working Group on Monitoring, the EU has actively contributed to strengthening the implementation and encourages Participants to continue committing themselves to enhanced scrutiny through KP peer review visits as well as to substantive annual reports. The EU would in particular like to express appreciation to South Africa, Liberia, the Russian Federation, Singapore and Vietnam for having hosted review visits in 2013 and to the countries which have invited review visits in 2014-15.

Furthermore, the EU notes with satisfaction that the KP intends to further improve its transparency and promote the publication of annual and review visit reports. 

We also believe that the joint EU-India KP Certification Scheme data-sharing platform as presented at the KP Plenary could be considered a good practice example for Participants to enhance information sharing as regards KP implementation. The KPCS’s credibility as an international process depends on effective implementation and enforcement by its Participants. In this regard, the number of fake certificates detected and the illegal shipments blocked in 2013 testify that the KP is effective in deterring conflict diamonds from entering the legitimate trade. The EU looks forward to further progress in that area in 2014.

In light of UN Security Council Resolution 2101 (2013), KP engagement with Côte d’Ivoire has illustrated the positive role that the scheme can play in situations where production and trade of diamonds might affect peace and security. As Chair of the Working Group on Monitoring and facilitator of the Friends of Côte d’Ivoire group, the EU was part of the recent KP Review Mission to Côte d’Ivoire and has been helping the country to fulfill KP minimum requirements as possibly could be achieved under the UN embargo. The EU welcomes the good cooperation with the authorities of Côte d’Ivoire in meeting the KPCS requirements and is determined to further support Côte d’Ivoire’s efforts to develop a transition strategy and roadmap towards the lifting of the UN embargo, and as such ensure that Ivorian diamonds will contribute to recovery and development. In this context, the EU through its Instrument for Stability will provide technical assistance for promoting the formalisation of the artisanal mining sector and reinforcing the country’s chain of custody.

As regards other countries in West Africa, the EU welcomes the KP’s continued engagement with Liberia under UN Security Council Resolution 2079 (2012), as regional cooperation remains key to ensuing stability in the region. In this context, the EU also very much welcomes the initiative from Participants in the Mano River region to enhance their cooperation on KPCS implementation and policy harmonization efforts.

The most recent testimonial of the KP’s ability to deal with situations of non-compliance has been the temporary suspension of the Central African Republic from the Certification Scheme in May 2013. As the Chair of the KP Working Group on Monitoring, the EU is monitoring the situation  and welcomes the efforts made by the Central African Republic’s KP authorities to develop a work plan for strengthening the country’s internal control system, however, we feel that the security conditions in the country do not currently provide guarantees for preserving the integrity of the chain of custody of diamonds.

In looking forward, the EU welcomes the decision taken at the KP Plenary meeting in Johannesburg to consider establishing an innovation committee with a view toencouraging further debate on KP reform issues and how the scheme can respond to wider ethical issues. We strongly support the need to further strengthen and adapt the KP to meet future challenges in the global diamond supply chain and provide assurance for consumers that diamonds are not teinted by violence. 

Before I conclude, please allow me to stress that one of the unique features of the KP is its tripartite structure. Both industry and civil society are key elements in the KP and have contributed much to its initial establishment and subsequent operation. In this respect, the EU calls on all Participants and Observers to recognise the full diversity of opinions within the KP and continue working together to further enhance the Scheme’s credibility.

Mr. President, 

In 2013, the international community has demonstrated its determination to act collectively and constructively through the Kimberley Process, as a valuable instrument to prevent diamonds from fuelling conflicts and, ultimately contribute to economic and social development, particularly in developing countries. In this context, the EU welcomes the framework for implementation of the Washington Declaration on integrating development and artisanal and small-scale diamond mining in the Kimberley Process.

The EU would like to express its gratitude to South Africa for its stewardship of the Process this year. We now warmly welcome the People’s Republic of China as the incoming KP Chair  during the start of the second decade of the process and congratulate Angola with its election as the incoming KP Vice-Chair. We look forward to working closely with both the new KP Chairmanship and the Vice-Chair to bring renewed impetus and strength to the KPCS.

Thank you, Mr. President. 


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